Posts Tagged 'blog'

Synaptic Stimuli – aka visual love part 2

And another! Synaptic Stimuli is a consistent stimuli stimulator, which similarly to Hexapod delves into the world of textures and beauty.

[Handed over by the delightful Micah.]

(Not) for your eyes only: Hexapod

I absolutely love the images and words I find over at Hexapod. The deeply seated textures of the visually-dexterous and synapse-spurring images make me a little giddy whenever I visit. Fact.

shape+colour

I like shape+colour, Jeremy Elder’s blog. ‘shape+colour is beauty, art, words, movement, epic radness, and random awesomeness’. Definitely worth checking out for his taste in music, visuals and decent writing. Go on, give him a go!

The video is by Maxim Zhestkov, another find at s+c.

Design You Trust

lost

Since the beginning of my adventures in the blogging sphere, I’ve always tried to find and narrow down the list of blogs that are most inspiring and best filtered in the spheres of design, animation, … well, in all spheres actually. Design You Trust is so far the single most reliable source of inspiring design on the web I’ve seen. The blog was founded in 2007 by Dmitry Utkin and has bits of new design trends, news and events, photography, installations and fashion.

[Image courtesy of Hock]

Internet population

internet

Today another great infographic! Justin Wehr just posted this on his blog Wehr in the World. The graphs are a compilation of comScore data from the 15 countries most populated with Internet users. According to comScore, the number of unique users worldwide has just reached a billion, which still leaves  the world with only between 15 and 22 percent of its population on the Internet.

contrast1

Using the comScore numbers, here is the breakdown by country and region (in unique visitors as of December, 2008; some of the numbers are rounded):

Top 15 countries, by Internet population:

  1. China: 179.7 million
  2. United States: 163.3 million
  3. Japan: 60.0 million
  4. Germany: 37.0 million
  5. United Kingdom: 36.7 million
  6. France: 34.0 million
  7. India: 32.1 million
  8. Russia: 29.0 million
  9. Brazil: 27.7 million
  10. South Korea: 27.3 million
  11. Canada: 21.8 million
  12. Italy: 20.8 million
  13. Spain: 17.9 million
  14. Mexico: 12.5 million
  15. Netherlands: 11.8 million

Worldwide Internet Audience

  • Asia Pacific: 416 million (41.3%)
  • Europe: 283 million (28.0%)
  • North America: 185 million (18.4%)
  • Latin America: 75 million (7.4%)
  • Middle East & Africa: 49 million (4.8%)

[via Wehr in the World & Techcrunch]

A day in a life

clock_groundhog_day

As much as the word ‘routine’ hardly ever makes anyone think of a source of entertainment (unless it’s a cheerleading routine perhaps), the Daily Routines might change some opinions out there. The blog includes the daily routines of famous people including architects, writers, scientists and musicians. A sample below is a usual day of work in Charles Darwin’s daily routine:

7 a.m. Rose and took a short walk.
7:45 a.m. Breakfast alone
8–9:30 a.m. Worked in his study; he considered this his best working time.
9:30–10:30 a.m. Went to drawing-room and read his letters, followed by reading aloud of family letters.
10:30 a.m.–
12 or 12:15 p.m.
Returned to study, which period he considered the end of his working day.
12 noon Walk, starting with visit to greenhouse, then round the sandwalk, the number of times depending on his health, usually alone or with a dog.
12:45 p.m. Lunch with whole family, which was his main meal of the day. After lunch read The Times and answered his letters.
3 p.m. Rested in his bedroom on the sofa and smoked a cigarette, listened to a novel or other light literature read by ED [Emma Darwin, his wife].
4 p.m. Walked, usually round sandwalk, sometimes farther afield and sometimes in company.
4:30–5:30 p.m. Worked in study, clearing up matters of the day.
6 p.m. Rested again in bedroom with ED reading aloud.
7.30 p.m. Light high tea while the family dined. In late years never stayed in the dining room with the men, but retired to the drawing-room with the ladies. If no guests were present, he played two games of backgammon with ED, usually followed by reading to himself, then ED played the piano, followed by reading aloud.
10 p.m. Left the drawing-room and usually in bed by 10:30, but slept badly.

Extraordinary Confessions from Ordinary Lives

dishes

PostSecret is an ongoing community art project created by Frank Warren in which people mail in their secrets anonymously on one side of a postcard. You can find both funny and horrifying secrets, but all are meant to be true and revealed for the first time. Since 2004 the blog has accumulated over 200.000 secrets and has recently won the MySpace Impact Award worth $10.000 that was subsequently donated to the HopeLine 1(800) – SUICIDE.

The project has created a hub of anonymous confession and a place where people can find themselves less alone with their secrets. PostSecret has supported those depressed and troubled through providing a meaningful outlet of emotional distress and allowing the audience to give support to those sending the secrets. The postcards are not only an artform, but also a way for people to let go of their secrets in a symbolic way through allowing their secrets to be seen by those who handle their cards, PostSecret staff and finally those who see them online. PostSecret has published 4 books, which so far are the only way the project supports itself financially.

Santa vs. God

santa_vs_god

I just saw this at Unreasonable Faith, an atheist blog that’s actually quite fun to read. Since this kind of goes into the Christmas theme, Merry Christmas everyone!

One drawing at a time

picture-2

I found Urban Sketchers only recently and like their visuals as much as the concept that drives the blog. Urban Sketchers is a community of bloggers around the word who sketch where they live and visit. I’ll admit that I mostly support photography over all other forms of visual arts as far as depicting places and people goes, but the works on this blog really convey much more sense of place than sketches usually do. The idea started on Flickr about almost exactly one year ago and was initiated by a by Seattle journalist and illustrator Gabi Campanario and has transformed into a blog with so far over 500 subscribers.

picture-21

Here is a few words from one of the contributors, Margaret Hurst.

“I have been drawing on location for as long as I can remember. In fact, it’s difficult to work in the studio because I’ve been drawing “outside” for so long and in so many places. There is nothing like reportage drawing in the midst of swirling humanity or in the calm of a garden. All the sights, sounds and smells find their way into your drawings.

Drawing on location creates aliveness, animation and spontaneity in all your art, not just your reportage drawings. It’s always rewarding to see my students embark on this road.

Once you become a reportage artist everything you do is infused with motion and life. It’s difficult to see the world any other way. To go somewhere and filter that world through your eyes and hands and create a piece of art that no one else can create is a great feeling. It’s an experience I love to live whenever I get the chance.”

Post-Haloween artum

Overall, I’ve got to say I was pretty unimpressed by London’s will to dress as I walked the streets late at night yesterday. So, whew, thank god for the web and being able to supress my disappointments with reality! I found this site linked on Neatorama today and along with it some pretty nifty images…


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